Turkey Sausage Bolognese

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Clock Icon for Prep Time 20 min prep
Person Icon for Serving Size 4 servings
Carrot Icon for Number of Ingredients Size 13 ingredients

Although I love a good Bolognese sauce, I don’t like to eat too much ground beef.It contains too much saturated fat. Through trial and error, I’ve found that turkey sausage makes a very tasty...

Watch the video to learn how to make it.


Ingredients


  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 cup chopped onion
  • ½ cup chopped carrot
  • ½ cup celery
  • ¼ teaspoon crushed fennel seed (see Ann’s Tips)
  • 1 sprig rosemary
  • ¾ hot Italian style turkey sausage, squeezed out of its casings
  • 1 garlic clove, minced
  • 1 teaspoon red wine vinegar
  • ½ cup chicken broth or water
  • 2 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 1 (14-ounce) can crushed tomato
  • Salt and pepper, to taste

Nutrition Facts

Calories

125 cals

Fat

5 g

Saturated Fat

1 g

Polyunsaturated Fat

1 g

Monounsaturated Fat

3 g

Carbohydrates

17 g

Sugar

9 g

Fiber

4 g

Protein

6 g

Sodium

521 mg

Directions

  1. Heat oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Cook onions, carrots, celery, fennel seeds, and rosemary until tender, about 5 minutes.
  2. Add the sausage and garlic, breaking the sausage into pieces. Once the sausage is no longer pink, add the vinegar and broth. Continue cooking until the broth has evaporated.
  3. Stir in the tomato paste and crushed tomato. Bring to a boil then simmer for at least 10 minutes.  Season with salt and pepper. Remove rosemary sprig and serve with pasta.

Chef Tips

Do not use precooked or smoked sausages. If you prefer a less spicy dish, make it with sweet instead of hot turkey sausage.

If your sausage is already flavored with fennel, leave out the fennel seeds.

Registered Dietitian Approved

Our recipes, articles, videos, and more content are reviewed by our Registered Dietitian Kate Ueland, MS, RD, CSO, a board-certified specialist in oncology nutrition, to ensure that each is backed with scientific evidence and follows the guidelines set by the Oncology Nutrition for Clinical Practice, 2nd Ed., published by the Oncology Nutrition Dietetic Practice Group, a professional interest group of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, and the American Institute for Cancer Research and the American Cancer Society.


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