Cabbage

cabbage - cook for your life

Cabbage has long been recognized for its many medicinal properties, including anti-inflammatory and soothing agents largely accredited to its glutamine content, an essential amino acid. Cabbage leaves are even used as wraps for infected and inflamed skin and wounds.

Like all plants in the brassica family, cabbage contains indole-3-carbinol, and sulfur compounds, which have been shown to help protect against some types of cancers.

Depending on the type of diet you’re on during treatment, raw cabbage is not recommended for some as it can be more difficult to digest.

Chef Tips

Buy cabbage that is firm and heavy. Avoid cabbage with cracks or wilting leaves. The length of time you can keep a cabbage in the refrigerator depends on its type. Generally, green and red cabbage will keep for two weeks. Make sure to store the whole head in a plastic bag in the fridge. If you’ve already cut the cabbage, use it within a few days.

Raw and shredded cabbage can be added to salads as a nutrition-packed replacement for iceberg lettuce. Leaving shredded cabbage in a salad dressing for a bit will help tenderize it and add taste.

Raw cabbage is a mainstay for many delicious coleslaw recipes. It’s also a fantastic vegetable for flavor-packed stir fries, or a crunchy addition to any juicy burger.

Registered Dietitian Approved

Our recipes, articles, and videos are reviewed by our oncology-trained dietitians to ensure that each is backed with scientific evidence and follows the guidelines set by the Oncology Nutrition for Clinical Practice, 2nd Ed., published by the Oncology Nutrition Dietetic Practice Group, a professional interest group of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, and the American Institute for Cancer Research and the American Cancer Society


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