Corn

Corn is the world’s most widely produced crop. It comes in many colors, all of which are delicious and provide different antioxidants and phytochemicals.

Many consider corn a vegetable, but it’s actually a whole grain. Whole grains such as corn have more vitamins, minerals, phytochemicals,  fiber, and protein than processed grains. Fiber has been linked to a lower risk of colorectal cancer by feeding good bacteria in the gut, which supports healthy colon cells.

Corn is a staple worldwide. There’s polenta in Italy, mote from Chile and Peru, Mexican corn flour tortillas, and, of course, the buttery corn on the cob, popcorn, grits, and cornbread we love to eat here in the USA.  What we don’t fully realize is the extent corn has become a hidden component of processed foods, notably in the use of the ubiquitous High Fructose Corn Syrup.  Sadly, by the time corn gets to your table in this form, it’s been super refined and stripped of most of its vitamins and minerals, including vitamin C, thiamin, folate, and magnesium.

Chef Tips

In the summer, ripe, yellow sweet corn cobs are hard to resist.  When choosing fresh corn, make sure the husks are bright green and still feel a little damp. If the husks are dry, then the corn is likely old. Peel down the top silks and husk a little to make sure the kernels inside look plump and yellow. You should also be able to feel the large individual kernels underneath the husk.

Corn loses its sweetness and turns starchy tasting relatively quickly so eat it as soon as you can after purchasing. If you can’t, strip off the kernels with a sharp knife and bag and freeze the kernels for another day.

In the summer when corn is available fresh try using it in our Corn Chowder, and Corn & Tomato Salad.

Frozen and canned corn provide the same health benefits as fresh and are a little easier to use. Corn tortillas are a great substitute for flour tortillas in our Goat Cheese & Chard Quesadillas. They are lower in calories, higher in fiber, and provide a great gluten-free option if you require it.

Registered Dietitian Approved

There are many misconceptions about nutrition and cancer in widespread media. By using current scientific literature and recommendations from the Oncology Nutrition for Clinical Practice, 2nd Ed., published by the Oncology Nutrition Dietetic Practice Group, a professional interest group of the  Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, and the American Institute for Cancer Research, the National Cancer Institute, and the American Cancer Society, our Registered Dietitian, Kate Ueland, MS, RD, CSO and our team of editors work to help our readers discern truth from myth. The statements on this blog are not intended to diagnose, treat, or cure any disease. Always consult your physician or registered dietitian for specific medical advice.

Recipes You Might Also Like...

Cherry Compote Recipe Image

Cherry Compote

15 min prep
Carrot Soup Recipe Image

Carrot Soup

20 min prep

Leave a Review