Cultured Vegan Cream Cheese | Cook for Your Life
Cultured Vegan Cream Cheese Spread

Cultured Vegan Cream Cheese

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Rated 4 out of 5
4 out of 5 stars (based on 4 reviews)

Clock Icon for Prep Time 30 min prep
Clock Icon for Prep Time 240 min total
Person Icon for Serving Size 10 servings
Carrot Icon for Number of Ingredients Size 6 ingredients

This cultured vegan cream cheese is a great alternative to conventional dairy spreads. Rich in healthy fats and proteins thanks to the cashews and macadamia nuts, probiotics help it obtain a thick, spreadable consistency and...


Ingredients

  • ½ cup unsalted, roasted cashews
  • ½ cup unsalted macadamia nuts
  • 3 dates, pitted
  • 2 probiotic capsules or ½ tsp probiotic powder (see Chef Tips)
  • 1/3 cup refined coconut oil, melted
  • ½ teaspoon salt
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Directions

  1. Cover cashews and macadamia nuts in ½ cup water and leave in refrigerator for 48 hours. In a separate container cover dates in ¼ cup of water and leave them to soak alongside nuts.
  2. Meanwhile line a 4x4 pan with cheesecloth or a clean linen kitchen towel.
  3. Remove nuts from refrigerator and sprinkle the contents of probiotic capsules over nuts and stir.
  4. Combine soaked nut mixture and soaked dates (along with their soaking liquid) in a blender and blend until completely smooth. If mixture is too thick to blend, add a tablespoon or two of water. Add coconut oil and salt and continue to blend until everything is incorporated.
  5. Pour blended mixture into the prepared pan and fold the cheesecloth over the top of the mixture. Place the pan in the refrigerator to set for at least 4 hours. The cheese will keep in the refrigerator for up to two weeks, or in the freezer for 3 months.

Chef Tips

When buying probiotics in capsules or powder form, make sure it’s not a pre + pro brand that’s been blended with prebiotics. You need pure probiotics for the cheese to set.

Registered Dietitian Approved

Our recipes, articles, and videos are reviewed by our oncology-trained dietitians to ensure that each is backed with scientific evidence and follows the guidelines set by the Oncology Nutrition for Clinical Practice, 2nd Ed., published by the Oncology Nutrition Dietetic Practice Group, a professional interest group of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, and the American Institute for Cancer Research and the American Cancer Society