Corn & Tomato Salad

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Clock Icon for Prep Time 20 min prep
Person Icon for Serving Size 4 servings
Carrot Icon for Number of Ingredients Size 7 ingredients

This corn and tomato stunner is easily made while the BBQ is firing up. It brings together three seasonal favorites: corn, tomatoes, and basil. Deeply tasty and simply excellent, it’s a late summer dish...


Ingredients

  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • Salt and pepper, to taste
  • 3 ears of fresh corn, husked
  • 1½ cups cherry tomatoes, halved
  • ½ small shallot, minced
  • 1 teaspoon cider vinegar
  • ¼ cup loosely packed fresh basil leaves, torn

Nutrition Facts

Calories

113 cals

Fat

5 g

Saturated Fat

1 g

Polyunsaturated Fat

1 g

Monounsaturated Fat

3 g

Carbohydrates

18 g

Sugar

7 g

Fiber

3 g

Protein

3 g

Sodium

358 mg

Directions

  1. Preheat the broiler.
  2. In a small bowl mix together the olive oil, salt, and pepper. Brush the corn with the seasoned olive oil and transfer to a baking tray. Toss the tomatoes with the remaining olive oil. Pour onto the baking try with the corn, cut side up.
  3. Put into the broiler, turning the corn occasionally, for about 7 to 10 minutes or until the corn is browned and the tomatoes have broken down.
  4. Meanwhile, in a large bowl mix the shallots, vinegar, and a pinch of salt.
  5. Add the tomatoes straight from the broiler to the shallot and vinegar mixture. Mix well. Once the corn is cool enough to handle, cut the kernels from the cob. Toss with the tomatoes, then add the torn basil. Taste for salt and pepper. Serve warm or at room temperature.

Chef Tips

In the winter look to frozen corn. Toss a pack of frozen kernels in a little olive oil and roast them until they turn golden. Don’t thaw them out – cook them from frozen.

Registered Dietitian Approved

Our recipes, articles, videos, and more content are reviewed by our Registered Dietitian Kate Ueland, MS, RD, CSO, a board-certified specialist in oncology nutrition, to ensure that each is backed with scientific evidence and follows the guidelines set by the Oncology Nutrition for Clinical Practice, 2nd Ed., published by the Oncology Nutrition Dietetic Practice Group, a professional interest group of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, and the American Institute for Cancer Research and the American Cancer Society.


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