Mint & Almond Pesto

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Clock Icon for Prep Time 15 min prep
Person Icon for Serving Size 10 servings
Carrot Icon for Number of Ingredients Size 7 ingredients

If you love pesto but aren’t eating dairy, this recipe is for you. This pesto is a minty, cheese-free version of the classic Italian sauce. Use it to add a pop of herby freshness...


Ingredients

  • 2 cups mint leaves, washed
  • 1 cup flat leaf parsley leaves, washed
  • 1 cup basil leaves, washed
  • 1 clove of garlic, sliced
  • ⅓ cup almonds, sliced
  • ⅔ cup extra virgin olive oil
  • Salt, to taste

Nutrition Facts

Calories

155 cals

Fat

16 g

Saturated Fat

2 g

Polyunsaturated Fat

2 g

Monounsaturated Fat

12 g

Carbohydrates

2 g

Sugar

0 g

Fiber

2 g

Protein

1 g

Sodium

90 mg

Directions

  1. Pulse the mint, parsley, basil, garlic, and almonds in a food processor until finely chopped together.
  2. Leaving the food processor running, gradually add the olive oil until well blended with the herbs. Add salt and pulse to mix. Serve at room temperature. If planning to use the pesto as a pasta sauce, check out our Chef Tips.

Chef Tips

When using it as a pasta sauce, bring it to room temperature if frozen. Put 2 tablespoons per person (or to taste) in the bottom of a large pasta bowl. Mix with 2 teaspoons of freshly grated Parmesan cheese per person, if desired.

Cook and drain the pasta, reserving 1 cup of the pasta water. Stir in a little of the pasta water into the pesto and pile the hot pasta on top. Quickly toss together until the pasta is coated with pesto. Moisten with a little more of the pasta water if it seems too dry.

Registered Dietitian Approved

Our recipes, articles, videos, and more content are reviewed by our Registered Dietitian Kate Ueland, MS, RD, CSO, a board-certified specialist in oncology nutrition, to ensure that each is backed with scientific evidence and follows the guidelines set by the Oncology Nutrition for Clinical Practice, 2nd Ed., published by the Oncology Nutrition Dietetic Practice Group, a professional interest group of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, and the American Institute for Cancer Research and the American Cancer Society.


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