Our Favorite Five Grains

grains- cook for your life- anti cancer recipes

Grains have been a staple of the American diet for many years. Any food made from wheat, rice, oats, corn, barley, or another cereal grain is a grain product. Bread, pasta, oatmeal, breakfast cereals, and grits are examples of grain products. They are cheap and provide an excellent source of carbohydrates, which give us energy. Whole grains are grains in their natural form, before processing. They are excellent sources of fiber, protein, and B vitamins.

It can be easy to get in a rut with your grains, as they are usually something we stock in bulk in the cupboard for quick meals. As with all things in the diet, it is better to eat a variety of different types of grains to get the biggest variety of nutrients.

Here are five of our favorite grains and their benefits to inspire you to step out of your comfort zone and try something new.

Barley

Barley is a nutritious whole grain, high in beta-glucans, which are a type of fiber that helps to maintain cholesterol levels and gut health. Barley is available in hulled or pearl varieties. It has a mild, creamy flavor and a chewy texture that makes it ideal for someone who is exploring new whole grains.

All of barley’s best qualities shine in this comforting Winter Minestrone Soup recipe. Leftover barley can be used in this tasty Barley and Kale Cake which combines the goodness of barley with the cancer-fighting benefits of kale.

Oats

Oats are one of the most commonly consumed whole grains across the world. High in fiber, they are often eaten as porridge in the mornings to give slow-releasing energy throughout the day. Like barley, oats are also high in beta-glucans. The versatility of oats is also one of their main benefits.

Sick of porridge? Oat Pancakes are a great alternative for a filling breakfast. Oats can also be used in healthier sweet treat recipes, such as oat barscookies or oats shakes.

Bulgur

Bulgar is made from wheat kernels that have been dried and crushed. Most commonly used in tabbouleh, bulgur boasts similar health qualities to other whole grains. It is great in salads and soups, and can also be used in place of meat in ground beef recipes to save money and to increase wholegrain consumption.

Try Bulgur Porridge for a delicious twist on a classic breakfast meal.

Quinoa

Quinoa is often listed with grains, although technically it is a seed. It is one of the few plant-based sources of complete protein, which makes it a great addition to any meal.

Quinoa can be used in place of other grains in both sweet and savory recipes. Substitute it for rice in this Burrito recipe or try it in a traditional Peruvian Stew.

Corn

Corn is a gluten-free, high fiber whole grain that much of the world relies on as a major part of their daily meals. Corn has the highest levels of vitamin A out of all of the grains, and also contains antioxidants such as lutein, which are needed to protect against free radical damage.

Try this Rosemary Popcorn for a sophisticated snack bursting with flavor.

Registered Dietitian Approved

There are many misconceptions about nutrition and cancer in widespread media. By using current scientific literature, plus recommendations of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, the American Institute for Cancer Research, the National Cancer Institute, and the American Cancer Society, our Registered Dietitian, Kate Ueland, MS, RD, and our team of editors work to help our readers discern truth from myth.

The statements on this blog are not intended to diagnose, treat, or cure any disease. Always consult your physician or registered dietitian for specific medical advice.



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